Our Greatest Fear


Posted May 16, 2014

After the recent Super Bowl, I heard Russell Wilson, the Seahawk’s winning quarterback, retell the story of he and his late father who said to him, “Why not you?”  Russel thought, “Why not me?” and “why not us in the Super Bowl?” Russell thought.  Somewhere 2014_newsletterin Russell’s belief system he felt deserving or as deserving as anyone else.  I couldn’t agree more.  Russell opened his mind and heart to a larger experience and to a larger sense of self.  I don’t care where the old thoughts come from (Russell didn’t psychoanalytically retrace those old thoughts), I just want you to boot the dis-empowering beliefs we’ve created and pack in empowering, affirming beliefs.  Marianne Williamson summed it up pretty well in a poem called “Our Greatest Fear.”

Our Greatest Fear
It is our light not our darkness that most frightens us
Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate.
Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
It is our light not our darkness that most frightens us.
We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous,
talented and fabulous?Actually, who are you not to be?
Your playing small does not serve the world.
There’s nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other
people won’t feel insecure around you.
It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone.
And as we let our own light shine,
we unconsciously give other people
permission to do the same.As we are liberated from our own fear,
Our presence automatically liberates others.

Isn’t it true?  I mean, who is this beautiful life and the experiences in it for?  Who are we not to shine with our family, complete our educational goals, have top-notch health, enjoy loving relationships, and have a strong, positive sense of well-being?  And why not play big in the world by being brilliant, gorgeous, talented and fabulous?

Why not you?


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