Career Assessment Inventory (CAI)


The Career Assessment Inventory takes individual’s workplace interests and compares them with other individuals currently in one of the 111 careers in their database.  The instrument helps college-bound and non-college bond people find a job geared towards their interests.

There are currently two version of the CAI – The Enhanced Version and the Vocational Version.  The Vocational version targets careers in which less than two years of post-secondary training are necessary.

The Enhanced Version includes a 370-item report using a 5-point scale for responses. Testing takes 35 to 40 minutes to complete and is done online or pencil-to-paper format.

Author

Charles B. Johansson

Where to Purchase

Pearson Assessments

Orange County Testing Services

Administration, Analysis and Reporting

Statistics Solutions consists of a team of professional methodologists and statisticians that can assist the student or professional researcher in administering the survey instrument, collecting the data, conducting the analyses and explaining the results.

For additional information on these services, click here.

Reliability and Validity

The Career Assessment Inventory is well known and well established instrument, used as a norm for many in searching for careers.  Test-retest correlation ranged from 0.91 to 0.96 for the general theme scales; 0.88 to 0.95 for the basic interest scale; 0.81 to 0.96 for the occupational scales (Zarrella & Schuerger, 1990).  An internal consistency coefficient between 0.89 and 0.92 supports high content validity.  The CAI is strongly like with the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory, the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey, and Jackson Vocational Interest Survey.  There is only one study available concerning the application of the CAI.

References

Elosua, P. (2007).  Assessing vocational interests in the Basque Country using paired comparison design.  University of the Basque Country.

Jagger, L., Neukrug, E., & McAuliffe, G. (1992).  Congruence between personality traits and chosen occupation as a predictor of job satisfaction for people with disabilities. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 36, 53-60.

Naylor, F.D., Kidd, G.J. (1991).  The Predictive Validity of the Investigative Scale of the Career Assessment Inventory.  Educational and Psychological Measurement, Vol. 51, No.1, 217-226.

Zarrella, K.L., & Schuerger, J.M. (1990).  Temporal stability of occupational interest inventories. Psychological Reports,66, 1067-1074.


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