Adult Attachment Projective (AAP)


Developed in 2001, the Adult Attachment Projective (AAP) is an instrument permitting the evaluation of adult attachment.  The test includes seven attachment images and one neutral image, 8 drawings in total, and the adult participants respond to these scenes.

A similar instrument is the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and also the Experience in Close Relationship Scale (ECRI).  AAP was developed in order to provide measurements of the mental representation and the defensive process that is associated with the attachment theory. The AAP test requires approximately 35 minutes to administer.

For more information about the Adult Attachment Projective (AAP), visit the research website.

Authors

Carol George, Mills College and Malcolm West, University of Calgary.

Validity and Reliability

According to West and George, the internal reliability for all the subscales were 0.82 alpha rating.  The studies to support this were conducted by Dr. Diana Benoit, Dr. Malcolm West, and independent judges that were blind to AAP classifications.

Where to Purchase the Book

Informaworld

Administration, Analysis and Reporting

Statistics Solutions consists of a team of professional methodologists and statisticians that can assist the student or professional researcher in administering the survey instrument, collecting the data, conducting the analyses and explaining the results.

For additional information on these services, click here.

References

George, C., West, M., & Pettem, O. (1999). The Adult Attachment Projective: Disorganization of Adult Attachment at the Level of Representation. In Solomon, J., & George, C. (Eds.), Attachment disorganization (pp. 462-507). New York: Guilford Press.

George, C. & West, M. (2001). The Development and Preliminary Validation of a New Measure of Adult Attachment: The Adult Attachment Projective. Attachment and Human Development, 3, 30-61

Main, M., & Goldwyn, R. (1985/1991/1994). Adult attachment scoring and classification systems. Unpublished classification manual. University of California, Berkeley.

Solomon, J., George, C., & De Jong, A. (1995). Children classified as controlling at age six: Evidence of disorganized representational strategies disorganization (pp. 3-32).  New York: Guilford Press.


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